[MP4] Guilty (2020) Bollywood Hindi WEB-DL - DaOptimistic World

Hot

Search

ShareThis

Friday, 20 March 2020

[MP4] Guilty (2020) Bollywood Hindi WEB-DL

[MP4] Guilty (2020) Bollywood Hindi WEB-DL
Guilty (2020)

2017 is Valentine's Day. A music festival is taking place at a Delhi college, but the most famous kids on campus— who have a band called Doobydo — are using drugs on the hostel building's terrace. A Hindi-speaking girl from Dhanbad, Tanu (Akanksha Ranjan Kapoor) is trying her best to woo the most famous guy in St Martin's College, VJ or Vijay Prathap Singh (Gurfateh Singh Pirzada), while his sister, Nanki (Kiara Advani) is looking on with disgust.

The vibe of this scene sets the tone of the kind of college life that Dharmatic is keen on portraying in the Netflix film Guilty — which is quite the opposite of Dharma Productions' candy-floss version of student life. The boys and girls swear freely, flaunt their tattoos and their bodies, and the drugs are free-flowing — because this is a web film, there are (predictably) no holds barred.

Nearly a year later, during the #MeToo movement's height in 2018, Tanu accuses VJ of raping her while his friends watched her on, in a tweet tell-all. Which results in a media trial and a storm in the social media. The students at the college are divided: some criticize Tanu for being an attention seeker and wanting to believe that VJ is innocent, while some students stand by Tanu and nudge her on fighting the case. VJ's parents— powerful politicians and socialites played by Niki Walia and Manu Rishi — in an effort to monitor the matter, threaten her on the night of the incident and successfully stop her from filing a complaint by police. A year later they file a defamation lawsuit against her when she tweets about it.

[MP4] Guilty (2020) Bollywood Hindi WEB-DL
Guilty (2020)


The film starts with the possibility of lawyers prosecuting the case for VJ and his influential parents as they interview the students of college and members of the band present at the incident scene. Through this, we're brought through flashbacks that fill in this puzzle's missing parts— who's buddies with whom, who's inspired to lie, what type of classism and sexism is at play here, and what the college atmosphere is like.

The Delhi representation is high in Guilty, with authentic DU lingo that is a mixture of variants of "scene ho gaya bro" and also references to Foucault and Virginia Woolf (common in intellectual DU corridors). Nanki is a song writer and she gives us some beautiful poetry, thanks to Kausir Maunir (some of them originally written and some Faiz Ahmed Faiz tossed around). In the first 10 minutes of the film, snide remarks are made about the #MeToo campaign and there's enough slut-shaming between the two leading women in Guilty: Nanki and Tanu. In fact, for a large part of the film, it is the two women who are pitted against each other, with the man in question — guilty or not guilty — getting away with the least spotlight.

[MP4] Guilty (2020) Bollywood Hindi WEB-DL
Guilty (2020)

But as you sink deeper into the narrative of Guilty, you realise writers Ruchi Narain and Kanika Dhillon almost want to manipulate you into judging characters and believing you know the outcome of the story, only to squash it as you reach the dramatic climax.


There's enough to engage you through the two hour run-time of Guilty — a pace-y procedural that unveils details in meticulous deliberation, a melodious soundtrack that doesn't overpower the storytelling and important dialogues that attempt to bring out the nuance of a power struggle like the #MeToo movement.








Yet unfortunately this is not enough to distract us from the film's histrionics and distorted look. Although the two actors— Kiara Advani and Akanksha Ranjan Kapoor — make the most of their parts by providing credible and stunning performances, they are relegated to some of the most dramatic and over - the-top lines, downplaying the credibility of their parts. Don't even get me started on the climax of the movie that's composed, directed and played like a street play, with Kiara Advani having a monolog of the Kartik Aaryan type that destroys the value of what's being said.



For a film that plays out like a narrative he-said-she-said, the point of view of Tanu as the rape victim in this story is not much in focus. So much time is spent enticing the viewer into a Gone Girl-esque plot pursuit, and very little time is spent giving us a representation of the views of both the accused and the victim. As a result, I've not really found myself interested in finding out the facts. This is maybe the greatest mistake in Guilty.

Notwithstanding, Guilty is an fascinating watch, and Dharmatic's props for putting together a diverse film that is mostly helmed by women. I think we should be happy that we've finally got a Bollywood movie about #MeToo

No comments: